Infographics of the Week for Sept. 29-Oct 3: Is a College Degree Worth It?

Here are your infographics of the week for next week.  They sit on different sides of the question, “Is a College Degree worth it?” so in addition to analysis, these could be used for an argu-write or personal response in the writers’ notebooks.  Below the infographics is an article Karyn Miller shared that relates to this week’s topic. 🙂

Bachelor's degree worth it Effects of rising college costs Is college worth it why go to college

(Click to make larger)

Here’s a related article from The Chronicle of Higher Education, complete with a quick write: College Readiness – Position QW (Thanks Karyn!)

Here are the discussion questions Brett Vogelsinger uses:

  • Which of these was the best infographic and why? (when looking at multiple)
  • How does the writer try to engage an audience, even an audience who may not initially care about the topic?
  • Is the text or the visual design most important in each of these? How does the use of color and white space affect your ability to focus on the main message of the infographic? How is font size used to emphasize certain facts?
  • Does the infographic make a claim or develop an argument? If so, how can you tell?

If you would like a certain topic/theme covered in “Infographics of the Week,” let me know in the comments or through email.  If you develop additional questions for use in your class and would like to share, please do!

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Infographics of the Week: Practicing Analysis of Visual Text and Providing Models for Performance Assessments

Inspired by this guy (who was inspired by Kelly Gallagher), I’ve decided to start “infographic(s) of the week.”  I will normally try to post them Thursday or Friday for the next week.  If you have ideas, suggestions, or wishes (themes, content, etc . . . ), feel free to email me.  I would love this to be a collaborative effort.

Using infographics in the classroom will help our students with analysis and the application of that skill to visual mediums.  It can also provide them with a model for creating infographics as a performance assessment product (see the inquiry plan and assessment on the English 1 blog for one idea).  Remember that piktochart is a free (there is a pay portion too) service that they can use, but students could also use Microsoft Publisher or Word (or even prezi for an interactive version) if they’re more comfortable designing them in those formats.

Here are the discussion points used by Brett Vogelsinger, a teacher in Doylestown, PA:

  • Which of these was the best infographic and why? (when looking at multiple)
  • How does the writer try to engage an audience, even an audience who may not initially care about the topic?
  • Is the text or the visual design most important in each of these? How does the use of color and white space affect your ability to focus on the main message of the infographic? How is font size used to emphasize certain facts?
  • Does the infographic make a claim or develop an argument? If so, how can you tell?

On to the infographic(s) of the week for September 22-26 (Banned Books Week):

Banned books 2 draft1Most Targeted Books

To make them bigger, just click on the infographic.

FYI: I will tag each “Infographic of the Week” post with the term, “infographic.”  That means if you click the word “infographic” in the tag cloud on the left side of the page, you’ll see everything I’ve posted about infographics.

If you want to know more about infographics in the classroom (as text and as projects), check out this great, short article: “Inventing Infographics: Visual Literacy Meets Written Content.”

Teaching & Discussing September 11, 2001 with TED

Looking for new ways to have discussions that matter surrounding 9/11?

Check out these TED Talks as ways to spark discussion or as text for Socratic Seminar, mini-seminars, whole class discussion, etc.  Don’t forget you could put these in EdPuzzle and add questions.

  • First, Aicha el-Wafi + Phyllis Rodriguez: The mothers who found forgiveness, friendship – a TED Talk from two mothers, one of a victim of the 9/11 attacks and one of a convicted conspirator in the attacks.  Simply the nature of this relationship – and the nature of grieving, remembrance, suffering – can spark a discussion different from the typical 9/11 discussions we have each year.  We don’t often think about the victims’ mothers and I’d venture to guess that we never think about the conspirators’ mothers.  Here, there is humanity amidst and beyond terrorism.  How does this/can this change how we think about 9/11 13 years later?  Why, in the aftermath of terrorism, should we embrace getting to know people from other countries, cultures, and religions?
  • Second, Zak Ebrahim: Zak Ebrahim: I am the son of a terrorist. Here’s how I chose peace – a TED Talk from the son of a terrorist (one involved in the 1993 World Trade Center attack that killed 6 and injured many more).  Although his father was involved in a different terrorist attack than the one we’re remembering on Thursday, Ebrahim’s talk is still relevant and poignant.  Consider discussing some of Ebrahim’s points about learning to hate (rather than hate being innate to a person or religion) about choosing peace . . . about not following in a father’s footsteps.   Now, 13 years since the attacks, some children of victims and terrorists are adults.  What is the personal, rather than national or international effect of these attacks?  Where does terrorism come from?  How do we choose peace?  There’s wonderful fodder for discussion here:
  • Third, Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy: Inside a school for suicide bombers – a TED Talk from a woman who completed a documentary, Children of the Taliban and spent time inside a school training children to be a part of their organization.  This is a terrifying TED Talk that begs many questions: What is the relationship between poverty and terrorism? (Interesting connection to our own military recruiting strategies) Why does the Taliban target children from poor families? What is the power of education? How do we fight this level of strategic indoctrination?  What is the danger of ignorance? Of relying on others for information?  This would be great paired with either 1 (the mothers) or 2 (the terrorist son) to discuss why we should reach out and know others and/or how we change (if we can) our path [can the young boys in this school change their “fate” the way Zak Ebrahim did?]

As always, if you need anything, want help planning or another brain to throw ideas around with, let me know!